Blog

Getting Started With Gulp

Gulp.js is a powerful javascript task-runner which many view as the successor of respected colleague Grunt.js. For those new to task-runners and their ecosystems, task-runners allow you to easily run repetitious tasks such as concatenating files, minifying them, uglifying them, preprocessor compiling, removing unused CSS, code linting and much more.

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Why Would I Ever Use setTimeout With a 0ms Delay?

I spent a couple hours today acquainting myself with the way that JavaScript (and in particular, the browser) handles the call stack as well as the event loop. For a much better primer on the topic than I’d dare to summarize, I’d check out this video. One thing stuck out to me while I watched the video: the use of setTimeout(callback, 0).

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How to Implement HTML Escaping Using JavaScript

I recently built a simple chat client (I know, I’m recreating late ‘90’s tech!) and in order to make my chat application safer, I needed to prevent XSS attacks using HTML escaping. To start, I had no idea what the frack an XSS attack was, much less how to utilize HTML escaping to prevent one.

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Using the Prototypal Inheritance Pattern in Javascript

As a self-starter in the JavaScript world, I began where many such beginners first dove into the world of programming: Codecademy. There, I learned about prototypes through the pseudoclassical style. Any time I researched after that, most resources I encountered relied on this style for instantiation patterns and it wasn’t until last week that I learned about another, similar style which is more explicit about how it operates.

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What the Banana is a Closure

I’ve spent the last few months (going on a year now) learning JavaScript, and during that time I’ve grappled with closures in a perpetual battle to acquire understanding through brute force. And yet, the concept of a closure, like many aspects of JavaScript, is not as confusing as it first appears.

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Why I Chose Hack Reactor

First off, for those who don’t know, Hack Reactor is a coding bootcamp. What does that mean? It means that you spend a full three months, around 11 hours a day, programming with a group of thirty other people, developing the real-world skills needed to work in software engineering today. Hack Reactor focuses on Javascript, used primarily in web applications, and as of late, just about anything else you can imagine due to the language’s popularity.

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